A Doll’s House

A Doll’s House

Question 1

Nora’s leaving at the end of the play is not a mistake. She has finally found the nature of her husband Torvald, who only pretends to be on her side when everything is fine. Nora discovered the real nature of her husband when he got to know that Nora had taken up a loan to pay for his treatment (Unwin, and Ibsen 12). Torvald saw the loan as a liability instead of seeing it as a sign of love from Nora based on the efforts she put to get a loan. After discovering that he had to pay the loan, Toverld threatens to leave Nora, therefore, breaking a promise to stand by her side that he made to her. After Krogstad revokes the loan, Torvald changes sides by declaring that he would not leave Nora, but the damage had been already done (Unwin, and Ibsen 17). The husband had proven that he did not love Nora, and Nora was justified to leave after discovering that her marriage was based on lie.

Question 2

Torvald is a tragic hero, because at the beginning, he had been a positive character, and by the end of the play, he rapidly went down the ranks to become the villain. The sudden changes in fortunes of Torvald make him appeal for sympathy from the audience after his wife left (Unwin, and Ibsen 25). Torvald is a tragic heo, because he goes from prosperity to adversity, from being a highly payed manager to losing his wife. Torvald was averagely good and treated his wife well, but the sudden mistake of abandoning the wife in the time of need spoils the previous good character, and he eventually suffers.

Question 3

The main characteristics of the middle class that the author portrays include manipulation, selfishness, and arrogance. The middle class is arrogant; it is proved by Krogstad when he does not listen to Nora’s plea not to disclose the secret of the loan to her husband. Krogstad also shows manipulation when he uses the fact that he controls Nora to convince her husband to retain his position or else he would reveal the secret (Unwin, and Ibsen 45). When Torvald becomes a manager, he exhibits selfishness when confronting Nora after discovering the existence of the loan and does not take into consideration the purpose of the loan. Nora took the loan to help Torvald, but despite her efforts, her husbad threatened to leave her.

Question 4

Nora is a typical trophy wife. The author of the play starts by describing how she was always under her husband and followed the rules set by him. Nora did not have a job or anything else except for her beauty and attractiveness. Her husband also took her for granted, and he proves it when he threatens to leave Nora proving he did not love her enough to be there for her in time of need (Unwin, and Ibsen 54). All the above factors show that Nora was under control, and she was just a symbol for her husband.

Question 5

A Doll’s House is a relevant literary work in the contemporary world, because it portrays the current issues faced by families, the existing manipulation, and the difference between the working middle class and the poor. Family issues arise where women do not have great value in the society, and their husbands control them without a choice. Women in the current families, especially in undeveloped countries do not have basic rights, and many regard them as a burden to the family. Manipulation is portrayed when Krogstad plans to retain his position by using the advantage he has over Nora due to her loan (Unwin, and Ibsen 22). The same manipulation exists in the political platform where politicians want to retain power through manipulation. Lastly, the play outlines the characteristics of the middle class people who show their arrogance and selfishness due to high pay and their professional jobs.

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